Skip to main content

Greek Style American Lamb and Kale Salad

Lava Lake Lambs graze freely on wild grasses and flowers, resulting in the most delicious, tender and flavorful meat you’ll ever taste from lamb… it’s only here for a short time and you’ll only find it in the Heinen’s Meat Department.

Greek Style American Lamb and Kale Salad
Cook time:
25min
Prep time:
10min
Total time:
35min

Servings:
8

Ingredients

Lamb

  • 1 Lava Lake butterflied leg of lamb, 2.5-3 lbs, fat trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Salad

  • 2 large bunches of kale, de-stemmed and chopped into thin slivers
  • 4 cups finely sliced purple cabbage
  • 2 cucumbers, cubed
  • 8 Roma tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup pitted Kalamata olives
  • 8 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
  • 2 cans chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans) drained and rinsed
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

Toss cubes of lamb with marinade in a resealable container or zip-top plastic bag. Make sure all cubes are well coated. Place in refrigerator for several hours or overnight to allow flavors to marry.
Preheat broiler and position oven rack 4-6 inches from heating element. Line rimmed baking sheet with foil or coat with non-stick spray.
Place lamb cubes on tray. Broil cubes for 5 minutes. Remove tray from oven and pour out any accumulated liquid. Turn lamb cubes to ensure even cooking and broil 3-5 minutes further until browned, has golden edges and internal temp reaches 145 degrees Fahrenheit. Tip: skewer several cubes onto thermometer probe for accurate temperature reading.
Toss all salad ingredients together in large bowl. Add lamb cubes (delicious warm or chilled) and enjoy.

Recipe and Photo Provided by Holly Larson of Grass Roots Nutrition for Mountain States Rosen.
By Heinen's Grocery Store
In 1929, Joe Heinen opened the doors of a small butcher shop on the east side of Cleveland, Ohio, aiming to establish himself as the city’s purveyor of quality meats. As customers came into Heinen’s new shop for their meat purchases, they began asking him to carry groceries as well. Joe added homemade peanut butter, pickles and donuts and by 1933, business had grown enough to include a line of produce and canned goods. Heinen’s Grocery Store was born.

This site is not optimized for your current browser (Internet Explorer 11).

Please switch to one of the following browsers for a complete viewing experience:

Chrome Firefox Edge