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Ribeye Cloud Eggs Benedict with Red Wine Hollandaise

Ribeye Cloud Eggs Benedict with Red Wine Hollandaise
Ribeye Cloud Eggs Benedict with Red Wine Hollandaise

This recipe and photography was provided by our friends at Pre Beef.

Have you ever heard of cloud eggs? If not, then you will soon discover that they are cheesy, fluffy and full of amazing flavor. Check out this recipe for a meaty take on eggs benedict featuring a delicious red wine hollandaise.

Ingredients

For the Meat

  • 1 PRE Ribeye, room temperature
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp. olive oil

Red Wine Hollandaise

  • 1/2 cup red wine
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 tsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp. salt

For the Cloud Eggs

  • 2 eggs (yolks and whites separated)
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese
  • Pinch of salt and black pepper

Instructions

For the Meat

  1. Preheat cast iron skillet to medium high. Season steak with olive oil and salt.
  2. Sear in skillet for 4 minutes on each side. Remove from heat and let rest.

For the Red Wine Hollandaise

  1. Simmer red wine in a small pot until reduced to 2 tbsp.
  2. In a blender, mix red wine, lemon juice, salt, egg yolks, and oil until fully combined and creamy.
  3. Thin with extra oil if too thick.

For the Cloud Eggs

  1. Preheat oven to 450 and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Season egg whites with salt and pepper. Using a whisk, beat until stiff peaks form. Fold in Parmesan.
  3. Create 2 mounds of egg whites on baking sheet and make indents in the centers.
  4. Bake for 3 minutes then add an egg yolk to each center. Season yolk with salt and pepper.
  5. Bake for 3 minutes or until yolks have set.

Plating

  1. Put each cloud egg on top of half the ribeye. Pour hollandaise sauce over the top and season with micro greens, chives and pepper.

Click Here to Print the Recipe for Ribeye Cloud Eggs Benedict with Red Wine Hollandaise.

By Heinen's Grocery Store
In 1929, Joe Heinen opened the doors of a small butcher shop on the east side of Cleveland, Ohio, aiming to establish himself as the city’s purveyor of quality meats. As customers came into Heinen’s new shop for their meat purchases, they began asking him to carry groceries as well. Joe added homemade peanut butter, pickles and donuts and by 1933, business had grown enough to include a line of produce and canned goods. Heinen’s Grocery Store was born.

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