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Upgrade Your Grains for the New Year

sprouted grains

I’m not a fan of New Year’s resolutions. Not that I’m against self-improvement, it’s just that many health-related resolutions involve a deprivation mindset. Giving up sugar is one example.

Although eliminating added sugar in your diet is an honorable goal, human beings react to food restrictions in the exact opposite way. For example, when we tell ourselves we can’t have something, like bread, ice cream, pizza, or donuts, it only fuels the fire of desire for those very foods.

Consider reframing your resolutions in a positive, permission-based fashion this year. Rather than list the things you will stop doing in order to reach your goals, tell me the things you will start doing instead. For example, I will incorporate a serving or two of whole grains into my meals each day. Doesn’t that feel better?

Speaking of whole grains, did you know they can be the perfect addition to support you on your journey to optimal health this year?

What are Whole Grains?

According to the Whole Grains Council, whole grains or foods made from them contain all the essential parts and naturally-occurring nutrients of the entire grain seed in their original proportions. This means that 100% of the original kernel – all of the bran, germ, and endosperm – must be present to qualify as a whole grain.

Whole grains—including those on the Fx 100 list (steel cut oats, quinoa, wild rice and brown rice)—and breads, wraps, and crackers made from these grains, offer more dietary fiber, b-vitamins, and minerals than their refined counterparts.

The following grains, when eaten in a form including the bran, germ and endosperm, are considered whole grain:

  • Amaranth
  • Barley
  • Buckwheat
  • Corn, including whole cornmeal and popcorn
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Quinoa
  • Rice, both brown and wild rice
  • Rye
  • Sorghum 
  • Teff
  • Triticale
  • Wheat, including varieties such as spelt, emmer, farro, einkorn, Kamut®, durum and forms such as bulgur, cracked wheat and wheat berries

What are Sprouted Grains?

Sprouting involves soaking grains in water until a sprout forms. After it is sprouted, it can be dehydrated and ground into flour, which is then used to make sprouted breads, crackers and chips!

Whole, unrefined sprouted grains are more beneficial for your health than non-sprouted because the soaking process allows for better digestion and nutrient absorption. They are also higher in fiber, antioxidants, and beneficial enzymes, making them a better option for those with diabetes.

Whole Grain Meal and Snack Solutions at Heinen’s:

Give your grains an upgrade with these whole grain solutions found at your local Heinen’s. I promise you won’t miss your old favorites…and you’ll even feel better too!

Sprouted breads and wraps:

  • Angelic Bakehouse
  • Alvarado Street Bakery
  • Ezekiel (Frozen department)

Grain-based side dishes:

  • Hurst’s Barley
  • Grain Trust Brown Rice (Frozen department)
  • Heinen’s Brown Rice Bowls
  • Bob’s Redmill Bulgur
  • Bob’s Redmill Farro
  • Eden Organic Millet
  • Heinen’s Organic Whole Wheat Pasta
  • Tinkyada Brown Rice Pasta
  • Heinen’s Quinoa (Frozen department)
  • Path of Life Quinoa (Frozen department)
  • Heinen’s Quinoa Bowls
  • Heinen’s Quinoa
  • TruRoots Sprouted Quinoa
  • Ancient Harvest Quinoa Dinners
  • Roland Wild Rice

Snacks:

  • Way Better Snacks Chips (Multigrain variety)
  • Lundberg Family Farms Rice Chips
  • Lundberg Family Farms Thin Stackers Puffed Grain Cakes
  • Angelic Bakehouse Crisps
  • Mary’s Gone Crackers
  • Wasa Crispbread
  • Over Easy Breakfast Bars (in Wellness department)

Cereal:

  • Ezekiel 4:9 Cinnamon Raisin Cereal
  • Uncle Sam Wheat Berry Flakes
  • Living Intentions Activated Superfood Cereal
  • Heinen’s Old Fashioned Oats
  • McCann’s Steel Cut Irish Oatmeal
  • Ancient Harvest Quinoa Flakes

Food for Thought …

Remember, moderation is the key to a healthy and balanced life. A few modest servings of whole grains each day is plenty. For example, make your pancakes from scratch using this Oatmeal Pancake recipe. Then at dinner, enjoy a scoop of quinoa with baked salmon and roasted veggies.

Melanie Jatsek, RD, LD
By Melanie Jatsek RD, LD
Heinen's Chief Dietitian, Melanie Jatsek, RD, LD believes that the answer to a strong, healthy and vibrant body lies within. She graduated cum laude from the University of Akron, earning a degree in Nutrition & Dietetics and has over 20 years of experience in wellness program development, health coaching and professional speaking. As a published author of three books and registered dietitian for Heinen’s, Melanie offers programs, services and tools to help Heinen’s customers take inspired action to build the healthy body they were meant to live in without giving up their favorite foods.

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